A Victory for Proponents of the Affordable Care Act

Just as Obama’s second term is nearing an end, he was able to gain a ruling from the Supreme Court that government health care subsidies for the poor and middle class people were legal. The Obama Administration took steps to receive a ruling from the Supreme Court that these subsidies were legal so that the Affordable Care Act would remain even after his term as president of the United States had ended.

Needless to say, this infuriated the Republicans who took a stand against the Affordable Care Act at its inception. They argue that in the long run, the cost of health care would increase for the poor and middle class people and would render them unable to afford health care. These subsidies would be available for all applicants for health insurance regardless of whether they are purchasing in a state providing a state sponsored insurance marketplace or a state which opted not to form am insurance exchange.

If the Republicans want this decision overruled, it is going to take an amendment to the Constitution. The Republicans were not pleased with the Supreme Court ruling and accused the supreme court judges of “circumventing Congress and rewriting bad laws.” The Republicans have vowed to work on changing this recent ruling during the next election.

This is an important victory for poor and middle class families who do not have health insurance and for those who feared they would lose their health coverage after President Obama left office. An estimated six million people were at risk of losing their health insurance coverage.

Before Obamacare was enacted, fifty-seven percent of private insurance enrollees were uninsured. The states with the highest rates of uninsured enrollees were: Texas, Arizona, Montana, Arkansas, Alaska, Nevada, New Mexico, Nevada, Florida, Louisiana, all with over twenty percent of their enrollees without health insurance. Despite the enactment of Obamacare, several states have not instituted an insurance exchange and have not expanded their Medicaid program. The states in red in the chart below have not expanded their Medicaid program.

uninsured_state_before_after_obamacare_070714-4

From Wallethub

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6 Responses to A Victory for Proponents of the Affordable Care Act

  1. lesliesholly says:

    We were uninsured before Obamacare. We were worried about the outcome of this case so this was good news for our family. I have blogged extensively about how the ACA has benefited us.

    • gailcav says:

      I have read so many stories about how Obamacare has helped so many people. We do not want to become a nation of sick people with no hopes of improving their conditions. It places undue strain on other family members. I am sure your blogging has helped other people as well.

  2. Cindy says:

    Thank you for the informative article regarding the of the ruling regarding the Affordable Care Act.

  3. Agatha says:

    This is interesting. We have something similar to ObamaCare in my country and it’s really helpful. It forces you to save for medical expenses and you co-pay for the medical fees after the insurance pay-out. It’s good, but then for those who don’t have medical issues the money just sits there and you can’t take it out even if you need the money for other things.

    • gailcav says:

      That is interesting. We have the same problem with people who are healthy, but are required to purchase life insurance. Many never use it during their working years and end up paying several hundred dollars per month. There are some drawbacks for some healthy people, unfortunately. But, it is best to be covered in the event of an emergency.

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